coontie starch mill

Sago saga - News  - Ocala, FL

The Coontie Mill The Tequestas were the first people to recognize the value of Arch Creek, but they were not the only ones. Around 1858 two ambitious pioneers used the creek and its natural bridge as a site for a coontie starch mill. These early entrepreneurs learned how to clean the poisonous roots, and dammed up the waterway under the bridge ...

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Wagner Creek (Florida) - Wikipedia

This flour was called coontie starch. The flour could also be used as laundry starch. (Note: Although coontie mills were very profitable the Zamia plant grew very slowly and could not be cultivated. When the plant supply ran out the coontie mill industry disappeared as well.

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Coontie - Wild South Florida

South Florida's First Industry By ERNEST G. GEARHART, JR. Manufacturing starch from the coontie root is probably the earliest known industry in Dade County. The Indians are credited with the discovery that starch could be extracted from these roots which once grew so abundantly ... own little starch mill. Whenever any extra money was needed ...

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Spring Garden (Miami) - Infogalactic: the planetary ...

Coontie is a slow growing cycad, typically reaching 2-4' in height with a 3-5' spread. The root can be harvested and processed for starch but the caudex (the woody part of the stem and root) is poisonous if not processed properly. By 1845, settlers were harvesting and processing coontie on an industrial level.

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Thompson, John W. B. - Biscayne Bay,... - A Tropical ...

Another starch grain shown in Fig. 6b has been securely identified as manioc, which also has surface damage from enzymatic activity (Pagán-Jiménez, 2015b). With only two of 48 starch grains with signs of enzymatic activity it is unlikely soil bacteria (postdepositional activity) led to these alterations.

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Starch Making: A Pioneer Florida Industry

The lower area of the creek (now known as the Seybold Canal) was first settled in the early 1840s when William English established a coontie starch mill in the area. By the 1850s, William Wagner and a business partner reestablished a coontie mill near the tributary which would later bear Wagner's name.

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arrowroot milling machine

 · It was a natural wonder of great beauty and a scenic gathering place from which eventually sprung one of Dade County's first towns. In 1858, early pioneers excavated this mill sluice to divert water to grind coontie for starch production.

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Miami Shores Village - EF Hutton

The die (dice), recovered from the Ferguson Mill Site, was hand-carved from bone and dates back to the mid 1800s! In the 1840s, George Washington Ferguson and Thomas Jefferson Ferguson operated a coontie starch mill at the north fork of the river. The mill employed 25 people and was the largest commercial site in Dade County prior to the Civil War.

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Detailed Information - All About the Coontie

 · The pulp was then soaked in water and strained through animal skins to separate the coontie from its starch. After letting the residue soak for several days to leach the poison, the starchy residue was dried until a yellowish powder that looked like flour was left behind that could be used to make, among other staples, bread. By the 1880s ...

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Coontie, a Graceful Addition to the Garden | Tallahassee ...

There at Ft. Dallas, Peacock assisted J. W. Ewan at his store/post office; he also operated a coontie starch mill a little ways up river. Sometime around 1879 Hannibal and Charles Pierce visited the Peacock family at their home. Charles Pierce: " We tied up to the rocky bank that served as a dock on the north side of the river and cooked supper

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Determining precolonial botanical foodways: starch ...

 · Laid out in wooden racks, the starch dried quickly and the sun bleached it white. In the early 1900s, several commercial factories in South Florida processed coontie roots for the manufacture of arrowroot biscuits. But coontie starch was not as successful as the pioneers thought, and the mill was abandoned several years later.

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Mike Adams: Florida Coontie - a local living fossil ...

Starch Making: A Pioneer Florida Industry By MRS. ... Today coontie is a tradition and the eight manufacturers of 1870 are but names in a record, interesting as proving the extent to which the product ... with starch produced at this mill. Starch from this mill was shipped to Italy for the use in the manufacture of spaghetti.

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Arch Creek Bridge Historical Marker

 · By 1911 the starch had become known as “Florida arrowroot.” Florida mills processed coontie for military use in World War I. All of that harvesting and processing took its toll. Once commonly found in the wild, coontie is now listed as a Commercially Exploited Plant [(FDACS/DPI rule 5B-40.0055 (C)]. That prohibits its collection from the ...

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ENH117/MG347: Florida Coonties and Atala Butterflies

Figure 3: Coontie Starch Mill in South Dade. Early families employed makeshift mills to process the root of a cycad plant found in large quantities and which Native Americans in the area called coontie or comptie. The plant yielded, with processing, a starch used in stews, biscuits and breads and represented the area’s chief cash crop, with ...

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Wanton Wicked Wiki | City / Central

the hurst coontie starch mill. the hurst coontie starch mill The area was first settled in the early 1840s when William English established a coontie starch mill in the area in the 1840s. By the 1850s, William Wagner and a business partner reestablished a coontie mill on a Miami Contact Supplier. Starch Making: A … Get Price

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Spring Garden Historic District

The area was first settled in the early 1840s when William English established a coontie starch mill in the area in the 1840s. By the 1850s, William Wagner and a business partner reestablished a coontie mill on a Miami River tributary which would be named after Wagner. A freshwater spring was found on the tributary in the area, which caused Henry Flagler to build the private Miami Water ...

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Cycads - Richard Lyons Nursery, Inc.

 · The coontie (Zamia floridana) is actually a cycad, a plant usually confused with palms and ferns, yet related to neither. One well-known cycad is called the sago palm. ... A South Florida starch ...

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Strong leathery green Coontie leaves reach for the light ...

The narrative of the Wagner family spans the pioneer era of Miami from the mid 1850s on through the founding in 1896 of the City. For decades they ran a steam powered Coontie Starch Mill and they were key figures of Miami’s pioneer community especially its Catholic

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Coontie, a Graceful Addition to the Garden - UF/IFAS ...

The Indians also used coontie flour, mixed with honey, to make a type of sweet jelly. As coontie starch became a popular flour substitute for bread-making, the plant rapidly became an important ...

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Remember Food Fair? Florida’s lost grocery stores | Miami ...

 · Strong leathery green Coontie leaves reach for the light The short, woody stem and rootstock of this primitive fernlike plant (once used as a starch source by the Indians) is almost completely underground and produces a terminal crown of …

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COONTIES: PLANTS THAT BOTH SUSTAIN AND TAKE LIFE - …

As coontie goes, so goes the atala. When coontie became nearly extinct, so did the atala, but we're giving away part of the plot. Once common in Florida's pinelands and hammocks, coontie is rarely found in the wild today but it's extremely common in landscapes. Coontie is a slow-growing plant, reaching as high as four or five feet and about as ...

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Life on the Southeast Florida Frontier - Miami History

970 NW 10th Ave , Miami, FL 33136-2902 is currently not for sale. The 1,469 sq. ft. single-family home is a 4 bed, 2.0 bath property. This home was built in 1940 and last sold on 9/7/1994 for $85,000. View more property details, sales history and Zestimate data on Zillow.

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THE 1836 MASSACRE - Graphic Witness

By the early 1900s, the area encompassing today's Miami Shores Village was occupied by a starch (coontie) mill, a tomato packing plant, a saw mill, a pineapple plantation and a grapefruit grove. These were the various enterprises in which the early pioneers were engaged and with the coming of the railroad and its stop at the Biscayne Station ...

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Atala nectaring on Sweet Almond flowers | The Atala ...

Starch Industry. Around 1825, early settlers in the Fort Lauderdale area learned the Seminole's technique of removing the toxin cycasin from the coontie to produce starch. By the 1880s, several mills were in business in Miami. During WWI, one mill was processing as much as 18 tons of coontie daily for military purchase.

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The Coontie of Florida

The common name coontie is derived from the Seminole phrase “conti hateka” which means white root or white bread. By the 1880s, settlers created mills in Miami to process this starch and by 1911 it became known as Florida arrowroot. During WWI one mill processed up …

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